General Services

General Services is responsible for supporting various government service operational units to ensure LFUCG office settings and employee work stations are safely equipped and properly maintained environments. These services help enable the workforce to be accessible, productive and responsive to the municipal service needs of Lexington residents. 

General Services Commissioner’s Office supports staff by managing:

  • Government Center Mailroom
  • Employee Parking (Downtown Campus)
  • Real Estate, Utilities and Property Management
     

General Services Commissioner’s Office also serves as the LFUCG Telecommunication Officer:

  • Helping residents resolve complaints related to billing disputes and/or service delivery
  • Serving as a customer service liaison to utility and telecommunication staff 


LFUCG currently has franchise agreements with several companies for the provision of utility and telecommunication services (including cable television) within Fayette County. 

Learn more about cable franchises

Learn more about utility franchises


General Services also has managerial responsibility for:

Parks & Recreation

Manages 4,500 acres including 105 parks and 70 miles of trails. Parks & Recreation operates six aquatic facilities, five public golf courses, four community centers, three nature reserve areas and two cultural arts centers. We also support dozens of annual special events and community festivals. 

Learn more about Parks & Recreation

Facilities & Fleet Management

Maintains government office buildings and service facilities, as well as a fleet of 2,100 vehicles and pieces of large equipment. 

Learn more about Facilities & Fleet Management

News

Mayor makes top-level staffing changes

Appointments were announced for the Departments of Social Services and General Services.

Courthouse wins international award

On Wednesday, the rehabilitation of Lexington’s Historic Courthouse Square won the design award competition at the 56th International Making Cities Livable Conference held in Portland, Oregon.

What’s Under the Courthouse Dome?

It has been closed to the public for 60 years, home to rusting heating and air conditioning equipment, an elevator shaft, peeling paint and deteriorating plaster. Today, Mayor Jim Gray reopened the restored dome of Lexington’s Historic Courthouse. And it’s gorgeous.

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