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Fri, November 21 Fair,  35˚F  icon of current weather 

Thunderstorms, lightning and tornadoes, snowstorms, flashfloods, earthquakes, bomb scares, chemical spills and transportation accidents. These are just a few of the potential hazards we face here in Lexington-Fayette County.

When severe weather or other emergencies strike, the Division of Emergency Management helps coordinate community response and assists in getting everyone back on their feet, safe and sound. We want to make sure that Lexington is prepared to respond to emergencies, recover from them, and mitigate their impact.

Emergency Alerts
 
Remember one thing during an emergency: Don't Panic! You need to think clearly, act quickly, and know what's going on. Listen for emergency watches, warnings, and instructions on what to do to stay safe. In Fayette County, get information from these sources:

  • weather radio NOAA Weather Radio: Get information directly from the National Weather Service with these radios. They are very affordable and can be tuned to only receive information relevant to Fayette County. Visit the NWS weather radio site to learn more.  Click here for County Codes.
     
  • Emergency Alert System: The EAS is a network of radio and television stations and cable companies that automatically transmit information in an emergency. The designated EAS station in Fayette County is WUKY-FM 91.3, but other stations also re-broadcast announcements. Click here to learn more.
     
  • Cable Interrupt System: When an emergency occurs, our local cable company can break into any station in order to broadcast emergency alerts.
     
  • Outdoor Sirens: There are 27 sirens located in parks throughout Fayette County. When a tornado warning or chemical emergency occurs, a loud siren sound will be played. In the event of other severe emergencies, the sirens can play voice messages and instructions. Find a siren in your area.
     
  • Local Radio and Television: For up-to-date weather information, watch local television and/or listen to local radio in Lexington. Weather radars provide accurate information and they will transmit instructions from local officials.
     
  • AM 1620: Radio Lexington is a federally licensed radio service of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government.  The station broadcasts public service information 24/7, but during an emergency will broadcast emergency alerts and notifications. For more information on Radio Lexington AM 1620, please click here.
     
  • LEAN - Lexington's Emergency Alerts and Notifications
    The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government's Emergency Alerts and Notifications (LEAN) system is an automated community notification tool designed to enhance preparedness and facilitate urgent and necessary outbound communications to citizens during emergency events. (more)

Watches versus Warnings

You should know the difference between a "watch" and a "warning" for severe weather (for example, a tornado watch versus a tornado warning):

  • Watch: This means that severe weather of some kind may be on the way, so be prepared and take steps to get to safety if conditions become worse.
  • Warning: This means that severe weather is occurring right now. You should get to safety immediately.

Weather Preparedness Information:
Kentucky Weather Preparedness Committee

NOAA Weather Radio and other Severe Weather Preparation Resources
 
NOAA Weather Radio and other Severe Weather Preparation Resources Did you know there is a nationwide network of radio stations providing severe weather watches and warnings, as well as continuous weather information directly from the National Weather Service 24 hours a day? This network is called NOAA Weather Radio. To obtain this potentially life-saving information, you need a special radio receiver available at most electronic stores . Having a battery operated, tone-alert NOAA Weather Radio in your home is like having your own personal tornado siren. If you purchase a NOAA Weather Radio with the SAME (Specific Area Message Encoding), you can program your radio to alert for specific counties. A NOAA Weather Radio should be as common as a smoke detector.

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Last updated: 12/26/2013 10:06:04 AM